Super Bowl History

Daniel Vanderbent

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The Super Bowl: A Brief History

Tom Brady vs. Matt Ryan squaring off in the biggest game of the season. With so much pressure on these two quarterbacks, both would give anything to win.

In the end the more experienced quarterback won in epic fashion, mounting a 25-point comeback in the second half. Making it the biggest comeback in Super Bowl history. Other records broken included most Super Bowl appearances, most completions and passes in a Super Bowl, as well as the only Super Bowl to go into overtime.

The Super Bowl is played on the first Sunday of February. It is the culmination of the regular season which starts on the first Monday in September.

In the early 1900s the NFL was not as big as it is today. There were rival leagues in the United States. The most serious competitor to the NFL was the AFL or American Football League.

In 1966 the AFL and the NFL worked out a merger deal that would combine the two leagues into one big league that would be called the National Football League.

The first Super Bowl between the two leagues was played in 1966, but the leagues did not officially merge into one league until 1970. When this happened, the AFL was called the AFC (American Football Conference) and the NFL was called the NFC (National Football Conference). The NFC was thought of to be better than the AFC and the first 2 Super Bowls helped prove that.

The Green Bay Packers,  an NFC team, won the first two Super Bowls with Vince Lombardi as their head coach.

When Lombardi died in 1970, the Super Bowl trophy was named the Lombardi Trophy after the one and only Vince Lombardi.

The team owners of the NFL wanted to call the Super Bowl the AFL-NFL championship game. However Lamar Hunt, who was the owner of the Kansas City Chiefs at the time was the first person to use the term Super Bowl. He got the idea while watching his kids play with a super ball.

At first the game that now has over 100 million viewers each year wasn’t popular.  Nobody referred to it as the Super Bowl. Then it gained popularity with the media and once that happened it spread like wildfire through the world gaining popularity with everyone. 

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